Crossing the Border and Settling in

It’s hard to believe it’s already May, but when I look back at everything we accomplished in the last month, I can’t believe it’s only May! At the beginning of this year, I firmly decided to stop waiting for whatever “new normal” will eventually present itself, and started the process of moving to Guadalajara, Mexico. The first few stages went extremely smoothly: we got our visas from the consulate, flew to GDL, received our residency cards, found an apartment, all while working full-time (remotely, of course). However, the final stage of the move was a complicated one. We had planned to fly back to the US, get our vaccines, pack our car with the rest of our stuff, and drive the 32 hours from Orlando back down to GDL – all in less than a week, during a global pandemic. Here’s how it went:

First, a little more on the logistics of this particular endeavor…

Driving our car across the border and down into the inner states of Mexico meant that we’d have to get an import license for our car. The import license required a lot of paperwork (like copies of our residency cards, US driver’s licenses, passports, proof of Mexican car insurance, etc.) It also meant that we had to renew our registration in FL and update our US car insurance policy without actually being in the US (thanks Mom and Google Voice). With crossing the border, we also had to have a list of what we were bringing across (in English and Spanish) as well as up-to-date copies of our dog’s vet records for customs.

We did what we could in advance from GDL, but the week we spent back in the US was crazy! We were lucky enough to get an appointment at Walmart for the J&J one-shot vaccine (absolutely perfect for our circumstances), and we got the jab about an hour prior to the national pause. Whew! We also made sure Jenn got her yearly vaccines and check-up, and then started the process of stocking up on US-specific goods (like Everything Bagel seasoning and our preferred brands of socks and underwear) before packing our little car to its gills. Did I mention that during this week of planning and preparing, appointments and vaccine recovery, questions and more questions, Tucker did not take a day off work! He did, however, take a day off for the drive.

One heck of a road trip…

We drove from Orlando, FL to Baton Rouge, LA on the first day. It took just a little over 10 hours, which was longer than expected due to heavy rains. Jenn thoroughly enjoyed the ride in the backseat on a pile of pillows, dog beds, and blankets. Day 2 was from Baton Rouge to Laredo, TX (right at the border). This was also a little over 10 hours (a bit of a delay again thanks to Houston traffic), but we enjoyed both legs with region-specific favorites like Café du Monde beignets and Whataburger patty melts. Aside from worrying about sitting in a car for three days straight after getting a vaccine with blood clot tendencies, we didn’t think much of days 1 and 2. The border crossing and drive across Mexico was our biggest unknown, and no amount of Googling was helping us feel prepared.

Around 6am on Day 3 (the only day Tucker requested off from work), we went through the McDonald’s drive-thru (our goodbye to the US) and crossed International Bridge II, which connects downtown Laredo (US) to downtown Nuevo Laredo (MX). We went through the first of many gates/checkpoints around 6:30am, before sunrise, when there were only a handful of other cars. Each car was eventually directed into a space that reminded me of where you vacuum your car after a car wash. Very intimidating looking guards came over, opened all our doors, checked a few boxes/suitcases and asked us a few questions like where we were going, what items did we have with us, etc. They were also surprised by our little perrita who promptly barked at them when they opened her door. Once they had ensured we weren’t smuggling goods or people across, we were free to drive through another few gates into Mexico.

It was thorough yet efficient, but as we’ve been told again and again, it’ll be much more difficult going the other way. Luckily, we won’t have to do that for a while! Once we were officially in Mexico, our first stop was at the Banjercito (import license and general immigration office). I stayed in the car with Jenn while Tucker handed over our documents and got the stamped form we needed in order to drive on with US plates. After showing this form to another guard at the next checkpoint (just as you’re leaving Nuevo Laredo), we were officially on our way – eating our McMuffins and calculating mph into kilometers, perfectly content.

The next 11 hours were uneventful and absolutely beautiful. We took mostly toll roads, which are newer and very well-kept. We drove through the Sierra Madres Orientals, Monterrey, desserts, canyons, and many little towns/rest areas. We never felt unsafe; there were plenty of gas stations, convenience stores, and clear signage all the way down. The only slightly challenging part was navigating the passing zones (and the fact that some drivers will pass regardless of zone). Overall, we drove through 5 US states and 5 Mexican states, 1,963 miles, over the course of 3 days, and I’d gladly do it again (although maybe not for another year or two).

And now we’re here (semi-permanently, or so it finally seems)

That first night in our own beds with all our stuff in the same apartment was magical! It didn’t take long to put everything away and feel truly at home, but there were (and still are) some things we’re getting used to. First, every time I’ve come back to Guadalajara, I have had to adjust to the altitude/climate again. We’re at about the same elevation as Denver, and in combination with the dry-season (and likely over-exertion) on this particular re-entry, I felt the familiar feeling of altitude sickness that seems to haunt me whenever mountains or plateaus are involved. Jenn is also adjusting to life A) in a high-rise building (with scary elevators) and B) in a city with a couple million inhabitants, but for her, the pros definitely outweigh any cons – so many new smells, a bird watching window, and her own room! Haha! Other than that, everything has been the usual fumbling along until we’ve figured it all out, which is exactly what I love about being an expat!  

Ultimately, I’m pretty proud of how well this all came together, and if I had been pining for an adventure, I definitely checked that off the list early in 2021. Now all that’s left to do is settle in and enjoy la vida en Mexico!

¡Estamos Aquí!

We’re in Mexico now! Yay! After over a year of immigration uncertainty with Canada, it feels great to be actively taking steps towards our new home base (even if those steps are taking us in a new direction).

So? What exactly is the plan?

Well, what are plans, really? This last year has definitely tested my ability to come up with back-up plans on top of back-up plans; however, what I came up with isn’t as crazy as it seems. When we got back to the US after our time in China, Tucker and I knew we wanted to stay in North America for a while (to be closer to family, to make pet travel a bit easier, etc.) Initially, we planned on moving to Quebec for a few years followed by a few years in Mexico. Unfortunately, the pandemic had other plans. In early 2020 our Canadian residency application stalled due to the fact that Canada and the US took wildly different approaches to the Covid situation. Even now, it’s unclear as to when the border will reopen and immigration processes will resume as usual, so we decided to flip the plan. Mexico and then Canada.

Getting to Mexico was surprisingly easy (just ask Ted Cruz – haha!) although, our process was slightly different. We opted for temporary residency, which is good for up to four years. In Orlando we got the appropriate visa from the consulate, and in our first two weeks in Guadalajara, we successfully completed the immigration process by exchanging our entry visas for our residency cards. Another “yay” moment! Currently, we’re up to our ears in apartment listings, looking for a place to rent for the next year or so. The housing hunt has been super exciting because we haven’t had this much freedom in choosing a place to live in a long time! I’m living my House Hunters International dream right now!

Once we’ve selected and moved into our new apartment, we have to fly back to Orlando, pick up a small, furry passenger (along with a few more suitcases) and drive across the border back down to GDL. The road trip is still in the planning stages, but it’ll be a respectable 30+ hour drive. Who doesn’t love a good road trip?! After that, the plan is to, somewhat unsurprisingly, wait. We’re still taking every Covid-related precaution, limiting many of our usual activities for the foreseeable future. Like most people, we’re eagerly awaiting our turn to get vaccinated and for life move on into some sort of post-pandemic phase.

What’s the situation like in Mexico?

“Sneeze Etiquette”

Speaking of Covid, many people have been interested in what the situation looks like south of the border. More or less, I would say it’s pretty similar to the US. Where we are, a majority of people are taking it seriously, wearing masks, limiting their time in crowded, enclosed spaces, working/schooling virtually when possible, etc. but there are always some who “forget” their masks, fail to wear them correctly, don’t care about the risks, etc. Cubrebocas are mandatory in Jalisco (our state), and in addition to checking for masks, most stores have employees stationed at the entrances spraying hand sanitizer and taking temperatures.

Another concern for us during this move (aside from the pandemic, of course) was our complete lack of connections in GDL and (to put it mildly) our less than rudimentary Spanish skills. We were wondering how difficult it would be to set up our phone plans, complete paperwork, contact renters, etc. On the whole, we’ve been extremely fortunate. We’ve already made a few expat friends and have done our best to pick up some Spanish basics muy rápido. Fortunately, as we’ve experienced in many parts of the world, the locals here are extremely helpful (and thankfully not resentful) when we struggle with the language. They’ve gone out of their way to help us with pronunciation, translation, even involving others to make sure the message is clear. I can never feel anything but humble when we, as foreigners who haven’t learned the local language, are treated this way. I sincerely hope to repay their kindness by doubling down on my Spanish skills – next year when we renew our cellphone plan or residency cards, I’m going to blow them away with my progress!

Hopefully my last temporary setup…

Somewhat less exciting, but a large part of our lives nonetheless, has been our transition into both working fully remotely. Thankfully our internet speeds have been up to the challenge, and it’s been really fun to break for lunch together everyday (albeit a bit early as our schedules are still tied to EST). Anyway, we were very happy that there was no interruption to either of our jobs as we transitioned to Mexico. Other aspects of life have changed a bit, of course, such as being back to never having any idea what’s going on when we step outside our apartment. Men walking the streets ringing cow bells, for instance, or even disappearing carrot cakes. We have so much to learn!

What’s the best part?

Actually, I think I just alluded to the best part: all the new things. We love an adventure, and there’s just nothing like being fully immersed in a new culture. We’re loving all the new things to try and to research. We’re also really enjoying getting to know a new city and a new neighborhood. Orlando taught me that there is so much to see in between the points of interest, and I’m continuing to stretch our walking tours further and further. Plus, I know we’re both incredibly grateful to be finally taking steps towards a feeling of semi-permeance and/or control. I have no problem with not knowing where I’m going, but as it turns out, I like to have a say in when I go.

What’s the worst part?

Sadly, maybe even predictably, the worst part is that we still have to think about Covid. I want to explore; I want to go and do everything, but I also need to be responsible and safe for myself and everyone around me. It’s not so much a product of where we are in the world, rather where we are in history, and unfortunately, it’s no easier in a new place. The good news is there might be a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel as long as we all continue to work together and trust the process. As I learned in Gotta Kick It Up, “sí, se puede”!

All in time