Chicago Eats

So, I just got back from another trip to Chicago, which, of course, means another round of non-stop eating! Really anytime I travel back to the US, I have a list of foods I want to have while there, but with Chicago, the list is always much longer than usual. Maybe it’s the city’s infamous specialties, the wide variety of cultural influences you can find, or the nostalgia-factor, but whatever the reason, to me, Chicago is a foodie’s dream destination! In fact, anytime someone asks me for recommendations when visiting Chicago, I always include a list of specific foods to try, and for this month’s post, I’m going to share my list for anyone else who plans to visit my favorite US city. Warning: this might make you hungry.

Chicago Deep-Dish Pizza

One of the first things that comes to mind when you think of Chicago has to be the pizza. Specifically, the deep-dish pizza. It is undoubtedly something everyone has to try at least once in their life – it’s like pizza on steroids! It’s baked in a pan to give it that two to three inches of thick buttery crust layered with everything you love about pizza: mounds of cheese, chunky tomato sauce, and all the traditional topping options. There is definitely a reason this style of pizza is world famous. And fortunately, thanks globalization (and shipping companies around the world), you don’t necessarily have to be in Chicago to sample the majesty that is Chicago deep-dish. Many of the larger chains will ship these one-of-a-kind, ridiculously heavy pies directly to your door. But which chain should you go with? Oof, that conversation is bound to start an argument with any Chicagoan.

Chicago Thin-Crust Pizza

Another common Chicago argument is deep-dish versus thin-crust pizza. Although Chicago deep-dish pizza clearly enjoys more notoriety, most locals usually prefer thin-crust (me included). There’s just something about a super thin, crispy crust, loaded down with toppings, and always cut into squares (something I once thought universal) that just hits the spot. And if you’re thinking “hey, I’ve had ‘thin-crust’ pizza before at *insert national chain here*”, think again because Chicago thin-crust is fundamentally different and 100% worth trying if you’re ever in the city. Trust me.

Chicago Hotdogs

Another Chicago staple is the Chicago Dog. Traditionally an all-beef hotdog “dragged through the garden” with mustard, sweet pickle relish, onions, tomatoes, pickles, and sport peppers all atop a steamed, poppyseed bun. I’m honestly not a huge hotdog fan in general, but the quality and uniqueness of Chicago Dogs makes them so much better than what you typically get at a baseball game or backyard BBQ. Just like with Chicago pizza, there are very strong opinions on who makes the best dogs and what can/can’t or should/shouldn’t go on them. Unfortunately, I always add ketchup to mine, which is decidedly very un-Chicagoan. Please, don’t judge me!

Italian Beefs

Alongside pizza and hotdogs, an Italian beef sandwich is another must-have whenever you find yourself in the Windy City. Thinly sliced, seasoned and simmered beef served on squishy bread dipped (or double dipped) in the au jus and topped with giardiniera (a sort of pickled relish), sweet peppers, and/or cheese – it’s an amazing sandwich to be sure. I pretty much always order both a hotdog and a beef because I just cannot decide which I prefer! This is absolutely why I cannot afford to live in the Midwest ever again – my pants would never fit! 

Polish Food

Another thing everyone should try (especially if/when in Chicago) is Polish food. I’m a bit biased here, but I think Polish food is one of the best cuisines in the world, and if you can’t make it to Poland, Chicago is your next best bet for some truly delicious and authentic Polish eats. Kielbasa, kabanosy, pierogi, bigos, gołąbki, placki ziemniaczane, żurek, rosół, and so much more can be found all over Chicago. If you pick the right place, you’ll absolutely feel like you’ve been transported to another country, and you won’t soon forget the homey, delicious dishes that have had a huge cultural influence on Chicago’s food scene.

Bakeries

In addition to all the amazing Chicago-specific restaurants and dishes you can try, I always recommend going to a local bakery as well. With all the immigrant groups that have continued to flow into Chicago throughout its history, the city has been blessed with some of the most amazing breads, pastries, and desserts in the US. Salt sticks are a favorite of mine; my mom loves Italian butter cookies; and my dad always goes straight for the decadent, dark chocolate desserts found at all the Polish bakeries. Unlike your basic grocery store bakery, a lot of these specialties have to be ordered in advance and sometimes only on certain days, so do some homework, get up early, and get the good stuff!

Delis

Similar to its incredible bakeries, Chicago’s delis are another thing you have to check out while in the city. Whether you want to get some cured sausages, delicatessen lunchmeat, or a sandwich the size of your head, a deli should be on your list. They have such an old-school, bustling community vibe (yes, even in the suburbs), and the prices are almost as amazing as the quality. Jewish delis in particular are so worth the trip because it’s really an experience as well as an incredible meal – just be sure you know what you want before you step up to order, like a lot of major cities, locals can be a bit impatient with the out-of-towners! 

Chicago Mix Popcorn

Another famous Chicago treat that is making itself known even outside the city, is Chicago Mix Popcorn. A mix of sweet, buttery caramel popcorn and salty, tangy cheese popcorn seems like a strange combination, but somehow it works amazingly well and is super addicting. One of the most famous brands of Chicago Mix is Garrett’s, which has been around since the 1940s and is marketed as “gourmet popcorn” (so you know it has to be good). But you probably don’t have to find a Garrett’s to get the good stuff anymore – most grocery stores nationwide sell a version of the “Mix” in the chip aisle. 

Fannie May Chocolates

And finally, a little dessert…another thing I absolutely always make time for when in Chicago is a trip to Fannie May. A confectionary founded in 1902, Fannie May has a plethora of chocolates and candies that are so unique, I travel thousands of miles to buy and transport them so my friends living abroad can also experience their exquisiteness. If I had to recommend just one thing to try from Fannie May, it would have to be the Mint Meltaways (even the most anti-mint people usually enjoy these perfectly balanced, creamy bites of chocolate). I literally have to ration them after a trip to Chicago! But even if mint isn’t your thing, they have a wide-variety of other truffles, caramels, and any other chocolate-dipped creation you can possibly imagine.

There you have it: my must-have list when it comes to Chicago eats. In my somewhat biased opinion, Chicago is a such great city to visit for a huge number of reasons, but if you’re a food-driven traveler (like I am), it absolutely has to be on your bucket list. So, I suggest you start planning your trip to the Windy city now, and just be sure to bring your stretchy pants with you!

Pandora’s Paperwork-filled Box

This month’s post might be a little different than usual. Actually, at this point I’m not convinced this isn’t just a form of catharsis (if I write it all down, I can let it go, right? Right?) We’ll see what happens. In reality, I hope this will be more than just my venting about my last few months in paperwork hell. I would actually like for this to serve as a record in case I have to do some of these things again and perhaps also as a guide for anyone else that has to go through these incredibly tedious processes. So, all I can say is buckle up as I endeavor to take you on a journey of a thousand citas (or “appointments”).

Okay, you might at this point be wondering what the heck I’m even talking about in this post. To clarify (and to account for any absenteeism these last few months), Tucker and I have been absolutely elbow-deep in various administrative processes. It all started in January when Canadian immigration (which we applied for back in 2019) contacted us needing updated and additional documentation to continue their processing of our permanent residency status. They needed another “up-front medical exam” and a copy of my renewed passport.

Up-Front Medical Exam

While not the most complicated of our soon-to-be mountain of administrative tasks, getting a medical exam in a foreign country always comes with a few added challenges. For one, Canada requires the exams be performed by one of their IRCC-approved doctors, of which there are only 12 in Mexico. Super unfortunately, none of these twelve happened to be in Guadalajara. However, there was one clinic in Monterrey, which we knew we’d be driving through in February while on another paperwork errand. The next (and probably somewhat obvious) issue with medical exams abroad is the language barrier. I had to call and make our appointments in Spanish and, of course, all the background questions and instructions throughout the exam were also en español. I learned quite a few new words throughout this process (como altura, vejiga, aguja, y radiografía), and I even made a joke about Tucker needing a paleta after his scary, scary blood draw.

Happy to have an excuse to visit Monterrey, honestly

Passport Renewal

The next request from Canada was for my renewed passport information. This was a tricky one because they needed me to renew it 6 months before it expired! When you live abroad your passport is your main ID, so to change it before we renewed our Mexican residency would have been impossible. We also knew we’d be going back to the border in February, so for this one, I actually appealed to Canadian immigration and asked for an extension. I was somewhat successful.

I think they’re just as sick of me at this point…

Mexican Residency Renewal

Truly our 2nd home in GDL

Of course, we also knew that in February our Mexican residency status would also need to be renewed. Everyone who applies for temporary residency in Mexico is given one year at the start, and after those first 365 days, you have the option to renew for 1, 2, or 3 more years. Since getting our initial residency cards was a fairly straight-forward process, I (perhaps) naively thought the renewal process would be even easier. We’re already in the system, no?! However, a series of extremely unfortunate events had us going back and forth to the Immigration Bureau 5 times (often having to wait weeks in between citas due to the new Covid procedures, thanks a lot Omicron). Unfortunately, one of the main reasons for all of these trips was a confusion with my apellidos (“last names”).  

Reimbursement at SAT

In Spanish “apellido” refers to your family name or last name. In Mexico everyone has 2 apellidos – their paternal surname and their maternal surname. My name actually follows this structure pretty well nombre: Danielle, apellido 1: Francuz, apellido 2: Rose. So, when the bank processed my payment that’s how the documents were filled out. However, in the eyes of the US (i.e. in my passport) and thus to the Immigration Bureau, I actually have 2 nombres: Danielle Francuz and 1 apellido: Rose. This discrepancy was a huge one in that I had to pay twice and later file for a reimbursement at yet a different office. I’ve now been to the SAT office (Mexico’s version of the IRS) twice to receive instructions and then my very own Mexican tax ID. I’m now in a “virtual line” for a third appointment where I will need to get my electronic signature before hopefully (finally) getting the reimbursement. Fingers crossed!

Import Permit Re-do

Of course, that wasn’t the only problem we had with the residency renewal…another issue came about because in order to straighten out the name debacle and successfully renew our residency cards within the new Covid procedures, we actually went past our initial residency cards’ expiration dates. Fortunately, the office assured us this wouldn’t be a problem with immigration because everyone was given leniency with the new digital cita process; however, very unfortunately, the Banjercito office (at the US-MX border), which issues import permits for foreign vehicles, did not have the same leniency in place. This meant that while we could remain in Mexico beyond our cards’ expiration dates, our car could not.

Flo, the trouble-maker

For this reason, we had to drive back to the border (before the expiration date) not exactly knowing what we would be able to do without the new residency cards to tie the permit to. Turns out there wasn’t anything we could do. You have to have either a tourist entry or a residency card to get an import permit (both of which were impossible for us as we were in limbo with cards on the verge of expiring and a scheduled appointment in another month). We also couldn’t just drive in Mexico without the permit and/or an expired permit because if we got caught, or when we came back to get a new permit, they could impound the car. Therefore, we opted for door number 3: drive the car across the border, store it for 6 weeks while we get our new residency cards, and fly up at a later date to re-do our permit and drive back down. OMG.

Police Certificates

If that wasn’t enough, while we were dealing with all the chaos of our Mexican residency renewal, Canada asked for MORE documents. With our updated location (i.e. Mexico) we needed to provide a police certificate verifying our legal/non-criminal status in yet another country (they already have these forms from us for the US, Poland, and China). However, completing the background check process in Mexico was yet another new experience for us, and it led us to another new office: the Fiscalía General Del Estado de Jalisco. Here, it took us a scouting mission, a few phone calls (en español), 3 citas, and a trip to another office (for a permission slip of all things) to finally get our fingerprints taken. Although, “fingerprints” is not really the right word. In Mexico, they take prints of your fingers, your palms, and the sides of your hands, it was actually really interesting. I’m also happy to say that I am officially NOT a criminal in Mexico. Tucker’s still waiting on his results…

Passport Renewal (for real this time)

Okay, so now it’s April. We’ve got our renewed residency cards (good until 2025), got our car with its rightful import permit back in GDL. Our appointment to try again for the reimbursement is pending, police certificates are in process, medical exams have been sent to Canada…time to renew my passport (still several months early, but what Canada wants, apparently, Canada gets). Much like all the other processes, this one took me 2 attempts. Forms, photos, payment methods, etc. everything the website says differs from the actual requirements in person, on the day. However, I have now successfully crossed this off my to-do list as well, and the new passport should be shipped sometime in the next 2-5 weeks. Praise be!  

And with that, I think we’re done, or at least very nearly. I do feel a little better getting all of this off my chest. I also feel extremely proud that we were able to juggle various forms of bureaucracy from three different countries all at once. Sometimes I think people see my travel photos and have the idea that Tucker and I are on a perpetual vacation, but I’m here to tell you it isn’t easy to live abroad. Of course, for me, it’s worth absolutely any amount of paperwork! This is my life now. 🙂  

US National Parks and Rec

For me, the National Park Service is easily one of the most amazing things about the United States. I am very fortunate to have seen many of these incredible places growing up, and even now when I plan trips back to the States, I always try to include a national or state park in my itinerary. The diversity and the beauty of North America is absolutely astounding, and I (and many others) can’t get enough of it. FDR once said that “there is nothing more American than our national parks”, and I really couldn’t agree more, which is why I want to share a few of my recent NPS experiences and ultimately spur others to get out there and see these beauties while we can!

Number and Size

The United States is a massive country. As the song goes, it stretches from sea to shining sea, covering a whopping 2.43 billion acres. Thankfully, in the 1800s, Americans realized that we might just need to protect some of our incredible land (mostly from ourselves). Thus, the first national park was born. These days, national parks make up about 80 million acres of the US, and when combined with state parks and other protected areas, represent about 14% of the total land area. As of January 2022, there are 63 congressionally-designated national parks and 423 national park sites located in the US, all chosen for “their natural beauty, unique geological features, diverse ecosystems, and recreational opportunities”.

What’s in a Name?

As mentioned, we have 63 infamous national parks, but what is the distinction between the parks and the national park sites? And what about national monuments or state parks? Well, the national parks can be seen as the big kahunas. They are what the other parks, sites, and monuments hope to be when they grow up. To be designated as a national park there has to be an abundance and variety of natural resources and large swaths of land or water areas that enable the protection of these resources. National park sites and monuments on the other hand are usually smaller and singularly focused (as in one element of a national park or a historic site completely separate from the national parks). They might also include things that are not so park-like, such as Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine.

State parks, however, are quite different. As the name suggests, they are run by each state as opposed to the federal government. This usually means that there is a lot more variety in how they are managed and upkept. Luckily, it also means that they are right outside your door (wherever that happens to be). Tucker and I really discovered the joys of state parks while we were pandemically pinned in Florida. Florida and most states east of the Mississippi are somewhat lacking in national parks, but they are not lacking whatsoever in state parks. Florida, for example, has 175 state parks, Illinois has 123, and Georgia has a still-respectable 46. While they might not be as big or famous as those in the NPS, they’ve also been chosen specifically for their natural beauty, historic interest, or recreational potential.

All Good Things

All of these protected areas are well worth seeing. Yellowstone, Niagara Falls, the Grand Canyon, the Everglades, and so many others are the epitome of America’s beauty, and the lesser-known names are no less so. Our national and state parks are extremely accessible and fortunately not cost-prohibitive. The most expensive entrance fees are $35, but the vast majority of parks charge only a fraction of that, making national and state parks not only an incredible experience, but also one of the cheapest you can find (so much better than a day at the movies, in my opinion). Not to mention, the money you spend at the parks goes to an amazing cause: the conservation and preservation of our incredible homeland. So, who’s ready to get out there and explore our amazing parks?!

Fun Facts: US Presidents Edition

Lots of holidays this week, no? Pączki Day, Lunar New Year, Valentine’s Day, and on Monday, Presidents’ Day! Yay! I know you probably feel like you’ve heard enough about US politics to last you a lifetime, but since I love a good theme AND I actually read a really interesting book about the US presidents last year, I thought I’d post some fun facts about our chief executives throughout the years. I promise these are solely amusing trivia tidbits – nothing that will make you want to smash your head against the wall or angrily take to Facebook.

Washington strikes me as a cat’s eye man.

1 – George Washington was an avid marble player.

2 – John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died on the same oddly fitting day: July 4th, 1826. James Monroe also died on July 4th (five years later in 1831).

3 – Thomas Jefferson loved pasta and designed and built his own “macaroni machine”.

Macaroni machine or torture device?

4 – James Madison was the shortest president (Lincoln was the tallest).

5 – James Monroe ran uncontested in 1820 ushering in the “The Era of Good Feelings”.

6 – John Q Adams liked to swim naked across the Potomac.

7 – Andrew Jackson was known for dueling and occasionally taking a bullet for his wife’s honor.

8 – Martin Van Buren had the nickname “Old Kinderhook”, which many believe is where we get the expression “O.K.”

9 – William Harrison got sick after his long, outdoor inaugural address and died after only 1 month in office.

Polk’s No Fun Zone

10 – John Tyler was called “His Accidency” as he was the first “Act of God” president.

11 – James Polk banned alcohol and dancing (among other things) from the White House.

12 – Zachary Taylor laid the cornerstone of the Washington Monument while snacking on cherries and milk, which might have given him the bacterial infection that eventually killed him.

13 – Millard Fillmore married his teacher, Abigail Powers.

14 – Franklin Pierce was friends with Nathanial Hawthorne.

15 – James Buchanan never married, the only president thus far to remain a bachelor.

16 – Abraham Lincoln had the legislation for creating the Secret Service agency on his desk the night he was assassinated (although at the time it was an agency meant to stop counterfeiting, not bullets).

You know what they say about hindsight…

17 – Andrew Johnson’s wife, Eliza McCardle, taught him how to write.

18 – Ulysses Grant hated wearing uniforms and received many demerits during his time at West Point.

19 – Rutherford Hayes and his wife Lucy were given a Siamese cat from Bangkok, it was the first Siamese cat in the US.

The Carters also had a Siamese cat, Misty Malarky Ying Yang.

20 – James Garfield was shot by an assassin in July 1881, but died 79 days later due to the misuse of the newly-invented metal detector as well as unsanitary conditions.

21 – Chester Arthur had Louis Tiffany of Tiffany & Co. redecorate the White House.

22 – Grover Cleveland was distantly related to the guy whom the city of Cleveland was named after.

23 – Benjamin Harrison was the first president to have his voice recorded.

24 – Grover Cleveland (again): after being diagnosed with mouth cancer, he had part of his upper jaw removed in a clandestine operation on a yacht.  

25 – William McKinley used to be on the $500 bill, which was last printed in 1934.

Puts those Benjamins to shame!

26 – Theodore Roosevelt was the youngest person to assume the role of president at age 42.

27 – William Taft might have never gotten stuck in a bathtub, but he did install custom-made tubs throughout the White House and various US ships.  

There is just something so bizarre with this…

28 – Woodrow Wilson kept a flock of sheep on the White House lawn.

29 – William Harding’s death might have been caused by an intentional poisoning.

30 – Calvin Coolidge was sworn into office by his father, an official notary public. Also, Coolidge was the only president (thus far) to be born on the 4th of July.

31 – Herbert Hoover was the first president born west of the Mississippi.

32 – Franklin Roosevelt was extremely passionate about his hobby of stamp-collecting. (Bonus fact: FDR’s wife Eleanor once had the KKK put out a $25,000 reward for her assassination.) 

33 – Harry Truman’s solo initial “S” was given to represent both of his grandfathers: Anderson Shipp Truman and Solomon Young.

34 – Dwight Eisenhower changed the name of the famous presidential getaway from Shangri-La to Camp David. He didn’t want to sound too fancy.

35 – John Kennedy was once marooned on an island and sent a successful SOS message via coconut in order to be rescued.

SOS! -JFK

36 – Lyndon Johnson had to deal with the assassinations of JFK, MLK Jr. and Robert Kennedy although he, himself, was never targeted.

37 – Richard Nixon’s daughter, Julie, married the grandson of former president Dwight D. Eisenhower.

38 – Gerald Ford is the only person to have been both vice president and president without ever being elected by the public/Electoral College.

Joan Quigley, Reagan’s astrologer. The 80s must have been wild.

39 – Jimmy Carter was the first president born in a hospital.

40 – Ronald Reagan frequently consulted with an astrologist during his presidency, even keeping a calendar of “good” and “bad” days. Somehow the assassination attempt just wasn’t in the signs…

41 – George H W Bush considered asking Clint Eastwood to be his running mate in 1988.

42 – Bill Clinton has won two Grammy Awards (other presidential Grammy recipients include Jimmy Carter and Barak Obama).

43 – George W Bush’s daughters, Jenna and Barbara, were the first First Family twins.

44 – Barack Obama’s first job was as an ice-cream scooper at Baskin Robbins.

45 – Donald Trump’s wife, Melania, is from Novo Mesto, Slovenia (formerly a part of Yugoslavia) in Central Europe.

Such a good boy!

46 – Joe Biden’s German shepherd, Major, is the first rescue dog to reside in the White House.

America in Ten Words

Intro
One Cool American

Earlier this year I read China in Ten Words by Hua Yu, which I would highly recommend! It’s a short collection of personal stories centered around ten words that the author feels represent China and its history, people, culture, etc. As someone who (at the time) was living in China and had spent the previous two years learning all about said culture, I absolutely loved reading from the perspective of Yu, a native Chinese. He touched on so many of the things I have shared in my various posts and gave new meaning to some of the things Tucker and I experienced ourselves as residents in China. In short, I loved it so much that I thought maybe I could join Yu in sharing a bit about my own culture or at least how I, one American, view it.

Honestly, this is a slight departure for me because I typically choose to write about my discoveries and observations on places and cultures that I am newly discovering myself, but this required a different sort of reflection. Even though I definitely can’t live up to Hua Yu’s work with one short blog post, I hope to share a few of the traits and characteristics (in no particular order) that, for me, make America, America.

#1 Independent

IndependentAs an English teacher I’m often asked to describe the United States and Americans, and for as long as I can remember, the first word that has come to mind is: independent. We love to feel independent! Independent financially, politically, emotionally; in our families, in our workplace, and in the world. Many of us longed to “be out on our own” at a very young age, and most Americans follow that course throughout their lives. We love expressions like “pull yourself up by your bootstraps” and “stand on your own two feet”. In our culture, there is an immense pride in (and often an expectation to) figure things out on our own. Whether this comes from the pioneer spirit of our history or from Hollywood’s “steal the spotlight” mentality, we can see the strong value placed on independence in all aspects of American lives. From our first declaration as a prospective country to our preference for ordering individual, non-shared meals, we focus every day on our individuality and personal independence, and if ever we feel it’s being threatened, look out.

#2 Entertainment

EntertainmentYou might have noticed that I didn’t get very far into this post without mentioning Hollywood. As much as many Americans like to think of that place as somehow “other”, the truth is, we are massive consumers (and producers) of entertainment, all thanks to Tinseltown. In fact, many of my students from all over the world have surprised me with facts and details about life in the US that were gleaned entirely from our movies and TV; some have even confessed that’s how they started learning English or even why they continue today. Of course, what they see in the movies is not always true to American life, but there are definitely many of our values and perspectives shared through our obsession with entertainment. It’s hard to imagine America without movie trailers, award shows, film conventions, and dedicated fandoms. As someone who hasn’t seen such American classics as the Godfather, Stars Wars, or Top Gun, I’ve been described a few times as “simply unamerican”, but I promise I’ll get to them eventually!

#3 Direct

Being told I’m unamerican (even jokingly) to my face brings me to my next Americanism. We are a direct people. After living in China for a few years, I know this to be absolutely true of Americans. We like to be told upfront, no matter what it is, and often regardless of how it’s said. I’ve heard people refer to Americans as blunt or straightforward, and although we aren’t always trying to be, we are often quite direct in our daily lives. Imagine communicating with someone (a family member, a colleague, or even a stranger) and not being able to figure out what they mean. You would probably want to shake them and say “stop beating around the bush” or “just break it to me”. We have a certain intolerance for ambiguousness coupled with the idea that things should be said and done as efficiently as possible, feelings be damned. This is why in our culture it’s perfectly normal to decline invitations or to challenge a superior. We would rather ruffle some feathers right off the bat than leave things vague or unclear.

#4 Patriotic

PatrioticAnother trait that I associate with America is our deep patriotism. We love our flag, our national anthem, and the values that we have long attached to our country, such as freedom, perseverance, and justice. Although patriotism means something a little different to each of us, as Americans this is our home, and we feel a certain pride and responsibility in that. Whether we show these feelings by hanging a flag outside our house, voting in every election, or representing our values abroad, we all like to feel that we have a role to play for America, and we’re happy to do it. Perhaps because we grew up with stories of how hard our forefathers, suffragettes, and civil rights activists fought for us to have what we have today, the sense that we need to take up the baton and continue to work for a better homeland has been deeply instilled. Or who knows, maybe it was just hearing that Lee Greenwood song year after year.

#5 Dreamers

DreamersAlthough this word has taken on new meaning and significance in the last few years, the American Dream and the people who embody it are not new, nor I think are they bound by political lines. America was founded on dreams: dreams of a new nation, dreams of equal representation, dreams of prosperity. We can still hear the US referred to as a “Land of Opportunity” from both inside and out. We love the fact that “if you can dream it, you can do it”, and thanks to our lack of a formal class system, many Americans have been able to make it happen all throughout our history. Most of us have immigrants in our ancestry, which is maybe one of the most classic versions of the American Dream. Others have seen their dreams come true in regards to socioeconomic status or overall success. Just like independence, Americans value people who dream big and work hard to make it happen. In short, we believe dreams can come true.

#6 Divided

Divided 2Dreams are wonderful, but all dreams are based in some sort of reality. And for Americans, right now that reality is a strong division. Party lines are more evident than ever, generation gaps and racial divides exist, and there’s no doubt that whatever the topic of conversation, people tend to divide up into various groups or “sides”. We have the Left and the Right, Boomers and Millennials, white collar and blue collar, Black and white, gay and straight, religious and non-religious, and so many other labels that, like it or not, separate us in some way from our fellow Americans. Although we are the “United” States and a supposed “Melting Pot”, many events have recently been shining a spotlight on our divisions and differences instead. Diversity can often beget division, or at least the perception of division, but I think we’re all also aware of the classic “United we stand; divided we fall”. Trends change everyday, and we can change as well.

Divided
At least Atlanta can be pretty United!

#7 Private

Another American feature that stands out to me is our penchant for privacy. On the whole, Americans are quite private (even with the growing popularity of oversharing on social media). We like privacy fences and secure passwords, and we fear Alexa and Siri are gleaning too much information from us. We have all sorts of privacy laws and generally feel that keeping things to ourselves is one of our inalienable rights. I often have students ask me “how old are you?”, “how much do you make?”, “why don’t you have kids?” and other such questions that, as an American, leave me feeling like my privacy has been breached. We talk about “personal boundaries” and “invasions of privacy” fairly regularly – both in the physical and figurative senses. It’s typically very clear to Americans where “the line” is and our use of small talk often demonstrates it: weather, sports, family members – all good; religion, politics, or anything “too personal”, strictly off the table.

#8 Friendly

Friendly
Super friendly (and patriotic)

Although we might like keeping things to ourselves at times, we are usually still quite good at small talk and making friends. From the outside looking in, Americans are often viewed as very friendly. We’re often smiling for no reason, making jokes with strangers about the broken elevator, or lending a hand in the form of opening doors for others or picking up something that has been dropped. Basically, we’re masters at “Meet-Cute Stories”. I think the reason we often come across as overly friendly is because we’re all pretty much willing to do these things regardless of where we are, who we’re with, or what we’re doing. We also tend to retell these little anecdotes throughout the rest of our day: “I ran into a man at the gas station, and you’ll never guess what he said…”, “Sorry, I’m late. I was chatting with a woman outside.”, etc. And don’t even get me started on what it’s like when two Americans meet while abroad; you’d think they had just met their long-lost cousin!

#9 Isolated

The US is big and only has two neighbors, a bit of a rarity in terms of geography, and these facts play into my next feature of “Americanness”: isolation. A large portion of Americans never feel the need to leave their homeland (and why would they with the bounty of things to do and see right at home?) or even keep track of what’s going on outside of their immediate surroundings. However, this tendency to face inward seems to contribute to a bit of ignorance about the rest of the world. You might have seen Jimmy Kimmel testing Americans on world geography, which as a geography nerd, definitely makes me cringe, but unlike other countries whose histories and even present day dealings have required a much more thorough knowledge of their surrounding nations, for Americans, it has rarely mattered (of course with increasing globalization that is changing every day). However, regardless of the underlying reasons, Americans can definitely be said to be “in our own little world”.

#10 Innovative

InnovativePerhaps because we’ve always been in our own little world, the US has also been a hotbed for inventiveness and creativity right from its start. From Thomas Edison and Clara Barton to Bill Gates and Katie Bouman, Americans have contributed a great deal to global innovation. Even the average American likes to think and talk about the future, and we always, as Walt Disney famously said, “keep moving forward”. It’s no wonder our people were among the first to take to the skies, race to space, and create all types of digital media. We simply love to take risks and try something new. We have the phrase “necessity is the mother of invention”, but in America, it might not even require necessity.

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Who could ever forget this incredible innovation?

So that’s my list. Of course, there are about a hundred words I sifted through before deciding on these ten! America is complicated; culture is complicated! And we can’t always fit everything into ten neat little categories. But maybe we can agree that reflection and openness can be great for developing a better understanding of ourselves and our communities. I would love to see some of the words you would add to your “America in 10 Words” list, or if you’re from another country, what words would you assign to your culture? We have a lot we can learn from each other’s perspectives, and I can’t wait to continue shifting mine!

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Stereotypes – What do Poles Think about Americans?

Stereotypes (or generalizations applied to any group) can be hurtful, dangerous, and (more often than not) completely inaccurate. However, being aware of stereotypes and discussing the reasons they’re held and perpetuated can lead to less prejudice and judgement, and more insight and compassion. In this post, I’m hoping to shed some light on certain national stereotypes, particularly ones held by Poles about Americans. My hope is that by reading the stereotypes others have for us (which we know are not completely accurate), we might start to rethink some stereotypes we hold for other groups (which are also inaccurate). To compile this list, Tucker and I spoke to many of our friends, colleagues, and students here in Poland about some of the most common perceptions and stereotypes Poles (and other Eastern Europeans) have for the United States and Americans:

Aggressive and gun-loving: Many people in Poland feel that Americans are, in general, aggressive and somewhat forceful in the way they behave. Be it in a conversation or in a meeting at work, we seemingly assert ourselves at times and in ways that Poles might not. Many people also threw “gun-loving” in with the aggression. It seems most Poles believe everyone in the US owns a gun, and that we’re very proud of that fact.

Avid movie-goers/TV watchers: For Poles, the great American pastime is obviously watching movies. Many Poles are surprised when I tell them I don’t go to the movies every week or even every month back home. They also believe Americans spend the majority of their downtime at home watching TV. Their attitudes towards this tendency aren’t necessarily negative though, as it seems they feel like we have TV programs that are worth watching. Hmm.

Carefree and informal: According to Poles, Americans are quite carefree. We don’t choose to spend our time brooding or reflecting on the world’s problems. Instead we are very focused on our immediate environments and are likely to make sure we have time for fun. Americans are also seen as very informal; we tend to talk to our friends, our bosses, and strangers we’ve just met in the same way.

Diverse and accepting: In Poland, the United States is seen as a very diverse place, with people from different backgrounds all living together; however, there doesn’t seem to be such a favorable opinion of this. Many Poles link our diversity to some larger national issues like security and political correctness. Yet, at the same time this same diversity is seen to have bred a willingness to accept anyone as a fellow American.

Fast food-aholics: Poles usually believe we all eat McDonald’s or something like it everyday. They’re not very interested in the variety of restaurants or the seemingly healthy options either. To Poles, pizza and hamburgers are junk food, no matter who makes them or what goes into them. Even the food we eat at home seems like “fast food” to many Poles. Soup in a can? Pre-packaged croutons? Don’t we make anything ourselves?

Lazy: On the topic of not doing anything for ourselves, many Poles think Americans are a bit lazy. We buy already prepared food, we hire people to do the simplest repairs, and we drive everywhere (even to the mailbox). Our laziness is evident even in the clothes we choose to wear: sweatpants to the grocery store, t-shirts year round, slip on gym shoes – all adds up to the picture of a lazy American.

Optimistic: Similar to our being seen as carefree, Poles also describe Americans as optimistic. Whatever situation we’re in, we’re likely to spout out things like “everything will work out in the end” or “I prefer to see the glass as half-full”. This tendency is often seen as a laughable trait, or in some cases actually comes off as “fake”.

Patriotic: According to Poles, Americans love America. Every day I surprise Poles with my decision to leave America long-term. We are seen as people who don’t care to leave our beloved country, and in order to show our love and pride, we all wear American flag t-shirts, have American flag bumper stickers, and play the national anthem at every gathering.

Google Images of “American stereotypes” are not pretty…

Rich: Many people in Poland also believe that Americans are rich. We don’t ever have to worry about money. How could we, when we’re going out to eat every day and to the movies every week? We are often perceived as having the newest technology, the biggest cars, and the nicest houses possible.

Smile a lot: When Poles think of Americans, they think of chronic smilers. We smile no matter what emotion we’re feeling, and many times without a reason at all. This seems to irritate some Poles and amuse others, but either way, it is one of the first things they use to identify Americans abroad.

Straightforward/Direct: Typically Poles describe Americans as direct or even blunt when they speak. Courtesy words and titles are just not needed in America; we make things happen by saying exactly what we mean with no flowery language or hesitation for other people’s feelings.

Uninformed: Perhaps in part because of our patriotism, we are also perceived as uninformed and egocentric. Most people believe that no one in the US would be able to point to Poland on a map, let alone discuss world issues in an objective manner. Americans are seen as narcissists who care only about things that affect them directly.

I’m sure every American who read this list thought (at least once), “This one doesn’t apply to me at all!”, and every Pole who read it (at one point or another) probably thought, “I don’t think that about Americans!” And that’s exactly the point. We can’t rely on stereotypes; what is true for some, is not necessarily true for all. People don’t fit so easily into the labels we create for them. Whether the stereotypes are based on nationality, religion, race, gender, sexual orientation, or any other group, we need to remember that everyone is an individual and should be treated as such. Being aware of the stereotypes that exist and not allowing them to affect our judgement will take us all one step closer to equality and peace worldwide. #Weareallhuman